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Planning Wild Cities: Human-Nature Relationships in the Urban Age
Planning Wild Cities: Human-Nature Relationships in the Urban Age
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Planning Wild Cities: Human-Nature Relationships in the Urban Age

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Publisher: Routledge, 2021, Author: Wendy Steele, ISBN: 9781138917927, Format: Hardcover, 13.8 x 21.6cm, 148pp, 18 illustrations

This book critically engages with the contemporary challenges and opportunities of wild cities in a climate of change.

A key focus of the book is exploring the nexus of possibilities for wild cities and the eco-ethical imagination needed to drive sustainable and resilient urban pathways. Many now have serious doubts about the prospects for humanity to live within cities that are socially just and responsive to planetary limits. Is it possible for planning to better serve, protect and nurture our human and non-human worlds? This book argues it is.

Drawing on international literature and Australian case examples, this book explores issues around climate change, colonization, urban (in)security and the rights to the city for both humans and nature. It is within this context that this book focuses on the urgent need to better understand how contemporary cities have changed, and the relational role of planning within it.

Planning Wild Cities will be of particular interest to students and scholars of planning, urban studies, and sustainable development, and for all those invested in re-shaping our 'wild' city futures.

Watch author Wendy Steele discuss wild cities with the authors of three new books that argue the conditions exist for planetary regeneration, but need to be seeded and nurtured. Speakers include Tess Lea (Wild Policy: Indigeneity and the Unruly Politics of Intervention), Ashley Dawson (People Power: Reclaiming the Energy Commons) and Hélène Frichot (Dirty Theory: Troubling Architecture):